ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO IN 3 MINUTES AND 18 SECONDS

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DESPERADO IN 4 MINUTES AND 31 SECONDS

THE WILD BUNCH IN 6 MINUTES AND 25 SECONDS

TOMBSTONE IN 3 MINUTES AND 52 SECONDS

noir77:

playing around with adam ferriss's gush
(i highly recommend that you try it yourself!)

noir77:

playing around with adam ferriss's gush
(i highly recommend that you try it yourself!)

noir77:

playing around with adam ferriss's gush
(i highly recommend that you try it yourself!)

noir77:

playing around with adam ferriss's gush

(i highly recommend that you try it yourself!)

(via adamferriss)

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Dario Robleto’s Cardiosonic Chronicle

It raises beautiful questions, like what’s the poetic price of a beatless heart? That’s a question I think an artist needs to ask philosophically—are we okay with letting go of a pillar of how we’ve defined ourselves if that means saving the life of a loved one or yourself? Dr. Frazier would absolutely say yes, and I agree with him, but there are these incredible questions to ponder along the way.

I’ve been trying to convince him that as sound history, this would be a remarkable moment. When you say “beatless heart,” that doesn’t mean that it’s silent, but nobody has recorded it as sound, so I’ve been trying for almost two years to build a relationship with him and explain the process that I’m going through and to convince him that we should record it as sound history. So in January I finally got the recording. It’s incredible. It’s brimming with meaning, but just as a sound experience, it’s truly stunning.

Back from New York. Time to edit Road Tolls again.

Back from New York. Time to edit Road Tolls again.

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Photographing the Desert Where the Mountains Float

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http://music.hyperreal.org/artists/brian_eno/interviews/intindex.html

These articles are in pretty good chronological order. The “date added” symbol shows you what’s new in the archive since your last visit (if anything). Some pages use JPEG scans rather than OCR’d text; where this is the case, we mention it so you don’t waste time downloading if you don’t want to. If you don’t know where to start, click here for EnoWeb’s top 5 picks. We are always keen to add to this archive - if you can help, please contact us. Articles on the Web that we come across in between updates are generally linked on the news pages, so do check those out as well.

When someone lies on the studio floor and sings at a microphone five feet away, Eno is in the air. When a band records three hours of improvisation and then loops a four-second excerpt of the audiotape and scraps the rest, Eno has a hand on the razor blade. When everybody except for the engineer is told to go home, Eno remains. Behind Eno stand John Cage, Marcel Duchamp, and Erik Satie, but those guys didn’t make pop records.

Sasha Frere-Jones on Brian Eno’s musical career: http://nyr.kr/1qzFAgx

(via newyorker)

Hero Worship.

(via barrystone)

(Source: newyorker.com, via barrystone)

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jon rafman

Some of the content, particularly the section with the “crush fetish,” in which a woman is depicted stepping on a live shellfish, is indeed difficult to watch. But I think the fetishes can evoke repressed desires as well as reveal latent societal tensions. There’s an underlying barbarism that can be found in daily life that I’m trying to capture. That said, I think the film is as beautiful and ironic, or postironic, as it is horrifying.

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Brooklyn, 2014

Brooklyn, 2014

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New York, 2014

New York, 2014

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